Workload and Crime Dashboard

The Harvard University Police Department has created a Workload and Crime Dashboard to display specific performance indicators for the Department. The Dashboard offers timely information about relevant workload and crime data and serves to improve communication, information-sharing, and transparency. Currently, the Dashboard includes three calendar years’ worth of data, comprising of calls for service, crime statistics, and arrests and criminal complaints. In the future, the HUPD intends to expand this Dashboard to include several additional key performance indicators for the Department. 

For additional information about the HUPD, how to report a crime, crime prevention programs, emergency notifications, and other important information about security and HUPD’s services on campus, please review the Department’s Annual Security Report.

If you have any questions surrounding the Dashboard, please email hupddashboard@hupd.harvard.edu.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why is the HUPD rolling out a data dashboard at this time?

The creation of a crime and workload dashboard was one of the recommendations established in the 21CP report; however, the Dashboard is also an integral part of HUPD’s commitment to fostering a culture of transparency and accountability throughout the Department and with the wider Harvard community.

Why has the HUPD not released this data earlier?

Most of the data released in Phase One has been available to the public in some form or another either on the HUPD website or through reporting to the Massachusetts State Police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Education. The HUPD feels the community is better served by sharing robust data that is hosted in one location for ease of access and transparency.

Why isn't the HUPD releasing use of force, field stop, and civilian complaint data?

The plan is to start releasing that data in early fall. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts passed a Police Reform Act in late 2020 that mandates the reporting of use of force and civilian complaint data. The Commonwealth has not published final regulations on data reporting, but as those requirements become known, the Department will ensure that the Dashboard is in compliance with this mandate from the state. 

Are third parties reviewing the data before it is released?

During the creation of the Dashboard, members of the HUPD met with several Harvard community members, including faculty and staff members from various departments across the University, and external subject matter experts to review the data and ensure the information is presented in the most organized manner possible.

Why should we trust the integrity of the data?

The Department is committed to the highest ethical standards in all of its dealings with the Harvard community. Our trust and legitimacy is tied to our integrity. Part of that commitment is ensuring that all data presented to the community or sent to a government agency is detailed and accurate. As an additional safeguard, the Department’s data and reporting is subject to audits and reviews by the Massachusetts State Police, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the U.S. Department of Education.

Why doesn’t the Department release copies of their incident reports?

In the interest of maintaining community members' privacy, the HUPD does not disseminate incident reports to the general public. Since the HUPD is a private police agency, the Department is not required under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Public Record Law to disseminate police reports to the public. The University's Office of the General Counsel has authorized the HUPD to provide both theft and accident victims copies of incident reports, almost exclusively for insurance purposes.

Is race/gender data based on self-report or officer assumption?

Race and gender determinations can be made through a license or other forms of identification, or via self-reporting, but may also be done through officer observations. The HUPD is collaborating with diversity and inclusion subject matter experts at the University to implement training for officers, to ensure that all members of the community as well as visitors are treated with dignity and respect during all interactions.

Where can I find more information about the demographics of the Harvard community?

Gender and ethnicity data on students, faculty, and staff can be found in the University’s Fact Book (https://oir.harvard.edu/fact-book.)

How often will the Dashboard be updated? Who will update it?

Phase Two of the Dashboard, which is projected to include data on field stops, use of force, and civilian complaints, is scheduled to go live in the early fall. Once the Dashboard is fully completed, the plan is to have members of the Department’s Records and Compliance Unit update all data on a quarterly basis, with the goal of monthly updates in the future.

Why doesn’t the dashboard data match the statistics in the Annual Security Report?

The criminal statistic data presented in the Dashboard is based on the Department’s Uniform Crime Report (UCR) submissions to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Although almost all of the UCR crimes are captured in the Clery statistics, the Clery statistics include additional offense types. In addition, the Clery statistics include reports from other police departments and from University officials serving as Campus Security Authorities.

What is the UCR program, and which agencies participate?

Since 1930, the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Program has served as the national repository for crime data collected by law enforcement. The UCR Program includes data from more than 18,000 city, university and college, county, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies. Agencies participate voluntarily and submit their crime data either through a state UCR program or directly to the FBI.

Will the Department release the raw data summarized in the Dashboard?

At this time, the aggregated data is the only data the Department will be releasing.

Why does the Dashboard include only 3-years’ worth of information? Will community members have access to data from prior years?

The Department decided on releasing three years’ worth of data to mirror the reporting requirements of the Clery Act. The Clery Act requires all colleges and universities to publish the previous three years’ worth of criminal statistics in their Annual Security Report released in October. At this time, the Department is only releasing 3-years’ worth of data.

Does the Department have any metrics regarding community outreach?

The Department tracks its community outreach activities, both formal and informal, and has done so for years. Over the last six years, Department employees have engaged the community in contexts outside of requests for service close to 1,600 times annually.

Why does the Dashboard not include more graphics to illustrate the data?

In order to ensure the data presented is accessible to all who wish to view it, we are limited in the amount of graphics we can use at this time. The goal is to utilize more graphics with Phase Two and the updated Phase One data.

Why does the Department receive so many ‘Found/Recovered Property’ Calls for Service? Should another Department on campus be handling this issue?

For the community’s convenience, the HUPD serves as a central collection point for lost and found items, such as keys, backpacks, eyeglasses, and bikes. If students, faculty, staff, or visitors, lose their property or find someone else’s property on campus, community members can contact HUPD to determine if their property was recovered. Currently, there is no other department on campus that serves as a central collection point for lost and found items. 

What is the difference between an arrest and a summons?

An HUPD officer may make an arrest with a warrant, without a warrant (if the officer has probable cause to believe the person has committed or is in the process of committing a felony), or for a misdemeanor offense committed in the officer’s presence. In instances where an arrest is not made at the scene, an officer may seek a criminal complaint at a later date from a district court via a written application outlining the act(s) that constitutes the crime(s).

Calls for Service

A ‘Call for Service’ is a documented record in the Department’s Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) System where an officer is dispatched to or self-initiates a response to:

  • Criminal incidents

  • Wellbeing checks

  • Disturbances

  • Safety escorts

  • Lost and/or stolen property

  • Lockouts

  • Suspicious activity

  • Alarms

  • Trespassing


Calls for Service (CFS) can be initiated by the community, by an officer, or in response to an alarm, and are addressed either in the field or over the phone.  Not all calls for service result in an incident report being written.

The calls for service data below represents calls where an HUPD officer was assigned to a call. These incidents do not include calls transferred to another public safety agency, Harvard department, or other entity more suited to deal with an issue.

Workload

Annual Calls For Service Totals 2018 2019 2020

YTD20

YTD21

Total Number of Calls 8,876 9,102 5,099 1,902 876


Year to date (YTD) data is from 1/1 - 3/31.

 

Annual Average Calls For Service

  • 2018-2020
    7,692

On average, 83% (6,384) of all calls for service from 2018-2020 were initiated by Harvard students, faculty, staff, contractors, or visitors.

Daily

On average, between 2018 and 2020, the HUPD responded to

21

calls for service each day.

Of the 21 daily average calls for service:

  • 22%
    occur during Shift 1 (11:00PM-7:00AM)
  • 45%
    occur during Shift 2 (7:00AM-3:00PM)
  • 33%
    occur during Shift 3 (3:00PM-11:00PM)

Annually vs. Daily Incident Reports Written

On average, from 2018-2020:

  • 2,945
    incident reports are written annually

  • 8
    incident reports are written each day

2018-2020 annual averages for Top 10 calls for service

On average, the top ten calls for service represent 73% of the total calls for service each year. 

  • Alarm - Intrusion, Panic, Other
    1,719

  • Found / Recovered Property
    754

  • Medical Call
    654

  • Alarm - Fire
    524

  • Escort - Courtesy, Money, Safety
    483

  • Theft Report
    405

  • Suspicious Activity
    340

  • 911 Call Abandoned
    262

  • Lockout / Lockin
    239

  • Visitor Conduct
    233

Subtotal:
5,613

The remaining 27% of the total calls for service are comprised of services related to non-criminal and criminal behavior, such as noise complaints/disturbances/loud parties (3%), lost property (3%), wellbeing checks (2%), motor vehicle complaints/tows (2%), vandalism (1%), motor vehicle accidents (1%), annoying calls/texts/emails and harassment (1%), assault and batteries/sexual assaults (0.5%), and frauds/identify thefts (0.4%).

Calls for Service by Type

The chart below depicts annual averages for calls for service data between 2018 and 2020.

2018-2020 Top Ten Average Calls for Service

Definitions

Calls for Service Definitions

  • Alarm-Intrusion – documents incidents where HUPD receives an intrusion alarm notification for an exterior door or an interior area protected by an alarm. Officers are dispatched to determine the cause of the alarm and to ensure public safety.
  • Alarm-Panic – documents incidents where HUPD receives a panic alarm notification for a location on campus. Officers are dispatched to determine the cause of the alarm and to ensure public safety.
  • Alarm-Other – documents incidents where HUPD receives another type of alarm notification for a location on campus. Officers are dispatched to determine the cause of the alarm and to ensure public safety.
  • Found/Recovered Property – documents incidents where an individual turns in found or abandoned property belonging to an affiliate that has been located on campus, or on property located off campus.
  • Medical Call – documents incidents where a student, faculty, staff, or visitor is either sick or injured and an HUPD officer and/or emergency medical personnel assess the individual, which could result in a transport to either HUHS or an outside medical facility
  • Alarm-Fire – documents incidents where HUPD receives fire alarm notifications. Officers as well as fire department personnel are dispatched to determine the cause of the alarm and to ensure public safety.
  • Courtesy/Safety Escort – documents incidents where an HUPD officer escorts students, faculty, staff, or visitors, either on foot or in a vehicle, to another location on campus or to a location nearby.
  • Money Escort – documents incidents where an HUPD officer escorts students, faculty, staff, or visitors transporting money or other valuables, either on foot or in a vehicle, to another location on campus or to a location nearby.
  • Theft Report – documents incidents where a student, faculty, staff, or visitor reports the theft of personal or University property on campus.
  • Suspicious Activity – documents incidents where HUPD officers become aware of concerning, non-criminal behavior occurring on campus.  Examples of suspicious activity may include (but are not limited to) an individual attempting to "piggyback" (enter a residence without the proper access card) or an individual combing through open packages in the lobby of a building.
  • 911 Call Abandoned – documents 911 call hang-ups received by Boston, Cambridge, or Somerville Police where HUPD officers are dispatched to determine the reason for the hang-up and to ensure all is well.
  • Lockout/Lockin – documents incidents where HUPD officers assist a student, faculty, or staff who is locked out of or locked in at a location on campus.
  • Visitor Conduct – documents incidents, commonly reported by University staff, where visitors have acted in a manner that may violate criminal law or University policies/guidelines, and the person is asked by an HUPD officer to either cease their behavior or leave University property.  (Prior to 6/1/21, this call for service was referred to as 'Unwanted Guest'.)

The data above is based on calendar year.

Last updated June 23, 2021

Arrests & Criminal Complaints

An arrest is the power and authority of a police officer to apprehend and deprive persons of their liberty, as provided by law, in order that such persons may be brought before the court to answer to criminal charges.


An HUPD officer may make an arrest with a warrant, without a warrant (if the officer has probable cause to believe the person has committed or is in the process of committing a felony), or for a misdemeanor offense committed in the officer’s presence. In instances where an arrest is not made at the scene, an officer may seek a criminal complaint at a later date from a district court via a written application outlining the act(s) that constitutes the crime(s).

To learn about the statutory authority of HUPD officers, please review the HUPD's webpage.

Arrests and Criminal Complaints

From 2018 to 2020, there were 163 incidents that resulted in HUPD performing an arrest or seeking criminal complaints against a person(s).

Of those 163 incidents, 48% (79) ended in arrests, and 52% (84) resulted in complaints being sought against a person(s).  These incidents involved a total of 173 persons.

Of the 163 incidents, 89% (145) resulted from calls from the community, and 11% (18) were officer-initiated.

Of the 173 persons arraigned, 13% (23) were Harvard University affiliates and the remaining 87% (150) were not affiliated with Harvard.

On average, from 2018-2020 officers make 26 arrests per year, and apply for criminal complaints at a clerk magistrate's hearing in  28 cases per year.  These incidents involve an average of  58 people.

Arrests and Criminal Complaints - By Offense

Offense 2018 2019 2020 YTD20 YTD21
Burglary/Larceny 20 34 9 2 0
Trespassing 14 23 7 3 0
Assault/Assault & Battery 9 10 1 1 0
Warrant Arrest 5 5 7 3 1
Other 3 6 1 1 0
Drug Law Violation 2 1 1 0 0
Vandalism 0 2 0 0 0
Receiving/Possessing Stolen Property 2 0 0 0 0
Harassment 1 0 0 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 0 0 0 0 1
TOTAL 56 81 26 10 2

Year to date (YTD) data is from 1/1 - 3/31.

2018-2020 Demographics - Total Arrests and Criminal Complaints

By Race and Ethnicity - Nonaffiliates

  • White
    69
    46%

  • Black/African American
    55
    37%

  • Hispanic
    17
    11%

  • Asian
    4
    3%

  • American Indian/Alaska Native
    1
    1%

  • Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander
    0
    0%

  • Unknown
    4
    3%

By Race and Ethnicity - Affiliates

  • White
    7
    30%

  • Black/African American
    8
    35%

  • Hispanic
    2
    9%

  • Asian
    5
    22%

  • American Indian/Alaska Native
    0
    0%

  • Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander
    0
    0%

  • Unknown
    1
    4%

Arrests and Criminal Complaints - By Age

  • 25 and over
    130
    75%

  • 17 - 24
    36
    21%

  • 16 and Under
    7
    4%

Arrests and Criminal Complaints - By Affiliation

  • Not Affiliated
    150
    87%

  • Staff/Faculty/Contractor
    14
    8%

  • Student
    9
    5%

Arrests and Criminal Complaints - By Gender

  • Male
    154
    89%

  • Female
    19
    11%

  • Non-Binary/ Genderqueer/Gender Non-Conforming
    0
    0%

The data above is based on calendar year.

Last updated June 23, 2021

Criminal Statistics

The HUPD is mandated by Massachusetts General Law Chapter 6, Section 168C to submit its Uniform Crime Report numbers on a monthly basis to the Massachusetts State Police.


The following criminal statistics detail three calendar years’ worth of the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Part I offenses from 2018-2020 that were reported to the HUPD and subsequently submitted to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) UCR program on a monthly basis.

Part I offenses include crimes against both persons and property, such as:

  • Murder

  • Rape

  • Robbery

  • Assault 

  • Burglary

  • Larceny

  • Motor Vehicle Theft

 

To learn more about the definitions of these offenses, please review the HUPD’s webpage on Uniform Crime Report and Clery Act Definitions of Crime.

Part I Crimes

From 2018 to 2020, the Harvard University Police Department carried an average of
414
Part One crimes in our annual Uniform Crime Report.

On average, property crimes account for 91% of total Part One offenses (378 average yearly incidents) and violent crimes account for 9% (36 average yearly incidents) of Part One offenses. On average, larcenies account for 85% of property crimes (321 average yearly incidents).

In 2019, the FBI's UCR program reported that, on a national level, property crimes accounted for 85% of total Part One offenses and violent crimes accounted for 15% of Part One offenses.

From 2018-2020, on average, 36 violent crimes are reported to HUPD each year. Of these, 78% (28) are classified as "Other Assaults - Simple, Not Aggravated."

On average, 378
property crimes are reported to HUPD each year.

Violent Crime

Offense 2018 2019 2020

YTD20

YTD21

Murder 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 8 2 2 0 1
Robbery 2 2 0 0 0
Assault 26 43 24 13 1
Total Violent Crime 36 47 26 13 2


Year to date (YTD) data is from 1/1 - 3/31.

Property Crime

Offense 2018 2019 2020 YTD20 YTD21
Burglary 51 48 57 28 1
Larceny 351 391 220 70 23
Motor Vehicle Theft 9 3 4 0 1
Total Property Crime 411 442 281 98 25

Year to date (YTD) data is from 1/1 - 3/31.

Violent Crime vs. Property Crime Averages

Annual Violent Crime Statistics 2018 - 2020 Averages

Of the average 36 violent crimes per year:

  • Assault
    31
    7.5%

  • Rape
    4
    1%

  • Robbery
    1
    0.2%

  • Murder/Non-negligent Homicide
    0
    0%

Annual Property Crime Statistics 2018 - 2020 Averages

Of the average 378 property crimes per year:

  • Larceny
    321
    77.4%

  • Burglary
    52
    12.6%

  • Motor Vehicle Theft
    5
    1.3%

The data above is based on calendar year.

Last updated June 23, 2021